Hospice Nursing


We knew the discussion was coming based on our pre-class preparation videos.

My group was having a discussion on end-of-life care and how hospice nursing is different than other kinds of nursing. We delved into the ethics of giving morphine or other comfort measures that may or may not drop our patient’s O2 saturation lower. I was of the few students who had experience with hospice care and nursing. Caring for The Brain had been most of my formative hospice experience, however, I have had other family members in hospice care and a good friend described her experience with hospice in relation to her mother’s illness.

Hospice nursing is different.

Your patient will not get better. He/She will not walk out of the facility or their home cured and on the path to wellness. “Wellness”, for a hospice patient, is more based on their comfort and whether or not there is peace at the end of life. You meet amazing people with interesting lives, yet you are usually meeting them at the end of their life’s journey.

In describing the above, and using almost the exact words, I teared and choked up in front of my colleagues. I thought of The Brain and my aunt and my grandma.

It’s easy to feel defeated on the floors as a nurse – I didn’t get patient medications on time, I failed to call the nurse or someone about the patient, the patient did not get to walk exactly when s/he called for me, the patient bathed 2 hours after s/he asked for a set up because I was held up in other patient rooms or needing to get vital signs on everyone before the next rounds.

But how does a hospice nurse not feel defeated? Every patient is choosing to stop life-prolonging measures and has, to some degree, accepted death as the resolution to their disease. It is a different form of nursing to know that you have helped your patient live well and provided them with comfort and anxiety relief. You have given the patient utmost consideration, care, dignity and security. You assure them that their body will be treated respectfully when they pass away.

And until those final moments, you share memories. You swap recipes for favorite meals. You hear about the patient’s life, passion, and wishes for care. You look at their choice for a casket or urn. You ask what they need and what the family and caregivers need. You are a nurse that stares death in the face and tells it that just because it is lingering does not mean there is fear.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Al and Hospice Meet | terry1954

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